Due to the Coronavirus (COVID-19) museums and galleries are closed, and various events and exhibitions have either moved online or have been postponed. For U-M’s guide to living, learning and working together safely, please visit Campus Maize & Blueprint.

Attend at Home: Events + Exhibitions for the Week of January 25th

Attend at Home: Events + Exhibitions for the Week of January 25th

This week, the Dr. Pamela Ruiter-Feenstra will be playing a special “MLK, Agency and Action” carillon concert at Lurie Tower on North Campus. Image courtesy of Stephanie Sorter/The Ann Arbor Observer.

Many of the museums, galleries, and performance venues at the University of Michigan remain closed due to COVID-19 restrictions; however, there will still be plenty of online events, exhibitions, performances, and films that you can experience from home. This week, we will continue to feature the events planned in honor of Dr. Martin Luther King Jr., as well as our recurring series events.

MICHIGAN PUBLISHING PRESENTS: BOOKS FOR SOCIAL JUSTICE

As the scholarly publishing arm of the University of Michigan, U-M Press publishes over 100 books a year in topics ranging from disability studies to African studies, from performing arts to political science. Over the last few years, the Press has been on a journey toward publishing in a more equitable, just, and inclusive way. Acknowledging that there is still far to go, Dr. Elizabeth Demers, the Editorial Director of the Press, will discuss the steps taken so far and future directions that the Press and other publishers can take. Pre-registration is required.

When: Wednesday, Jan. 27, 10–11 a.m. EST

THE LURIE CARILLON PRESENTS: MLK, AGENCY AND ACTION CONCERT

The Lurie Carillon will fill North Campus with music designed to amplify the voices of people of color during the “MLK, Agency and Action” concert. The free event will include original pieces, arrangements and African-American spirituals performed by carillonist Pamela Ruiter-Feenstra. The concert will include a piece called “MLK’s March,” which Ruiter-Feenstra wrote to teach children about King’s famous “I Have a Dream” speech.

When: Wednesday, Jan. 27, 1:30–2 p.m. EST

HISTORY OF ART PRESENTS: AFRICAN DIASPORIC MODERNISM: TROPICALITY IN THE WORKS OF WIFREDO LAM AND JOSEPHINE BAKER

This talk explores aspects of Samantha Noël’s book, “Tropical Aesthetics of Black Modernism” (Duke University Press, February 2021). It offers an investigation of how Caribbean and American artists of the early twentieth century were responding to the colonial and hegemonic regimes through visual and performative tropicalist representation. By proposing an alternative understanding of the tropics, this talk demonstrates how Wifredo Lam and Josephine Baker effectively contributed to the development of Black modernity, and even Black sonic modernity.

When: Wednesday, Jan. 27, 4:30–6 p.m. EST

STORY, WORD, SOUND, SWAY: IN PERFORMANCE & CONVERSATION WITH CARISA BLEDSOE & SCHROEDER CHERRY

Join Stamps Gallery for back-to-back virtual performances by artists and Stamps School of Art & Design alumni Carisa Bledsoe (BFA Interarts ‘14) and Schroeder Cherry (BFA ‘76). The performances are part of the exhibition Story, Word, Sound, Sway, featuring artists using performance, movement, text, sound, and design to interrogate systems of oppression and interrupt the status quo. Story, Word, Sound, Sway is on view at Stamps Gallery from January 18 – February 28, 2021. 

When: Thursday, Jan. 28, 1–2:30 p.m. EST

THE ARK PRESENTS: 44TH ANN ARBOR FOLK FEST

The 2021 Folk Fest is “at home” with streamed performances from cherished #ArkFamily and friends. Folk Fest will bring some of the finest folk and roots performers into your home on Friday Jan. 29th and Saturday Jan. 30th. Each night includes a blend of well-known and up-and-coming artists performing 20–40 minute sets exclusively for the 44th Ann Arbor Folk Festival providing you with an opportunity to hear artists you know and love while discovering great new talent. 

When: Friday, Jan. 29 and Saturday, Jan. 30, 7 p.m. EST

CREATIVES OF COLOR PRESENTS: BLACK CREATIVE PANEL

Creatives of Color, a U-M organization, presents an opportunity to connect with black professionals in creative industries. The guests for this event include Christal Robinson (Graphic Design), Asha Chai-Chang (Film Production), and Drew Metcalf (Film, Photography).

When: Friday, Jan. 29, 6 p.m. EST

Recurring Series Events

Damon Locks, Chicago-based visual artist, educator, vocalist/musician, will be the first guest of the season for the Center of World Performance Studies’ “Performing the Moment | Performing the Movement” series.

U-M ARTS INITIATIVE PRESENTS: FUTURE OF ART, IS ACCEPTANCE THE FUTURE OF ART?

Join Ayana Evans, described as “one part Wonder Woman, one part agent provocateur” (Roberta Fallon, co-founder of Artblog) for a live, virtual discussion with Reginald Jackson, Director of the Center for Japanese Studies at the University of Michigan and scholar of critical race theory’s relationship to gender. They will also discuss issues facing art-makers today: her mid-career shift to performance, and the potential for art to promote self acceptance and wider acceptance of all selves.

When: Monday, Jan. 25, 5:30–6:30 p.m. EST

PERFORMING THE MOMENT | PERFORMING THE MOVEMENT: DAMON LOCKS

Damon Locks, Chicago-based visual artist, educator, vocalist/musician, will perform and speak about his work with Prison and Neighborhood Arts Project (PNAP) and the Black Monument Ensemble. The Prison and Neighborhood Art Project provides arts and humanities courses to men at the Stateville Maximum Security Prison, where Damon Locks works as an artist educator. In the Black Monument Ensemble, Damon Locks uses music and sound to connect the past and future of the civil rights movement.

When: Thursday, Jan. 28, 6:30–7:30 p.m. EST

CLEMENTS LIBRARY EXHIBITION: FRAMING IDENTITY: REPRESENTATIONS OF EMPOWERMENT AND RESILIENCE WITHIN THE BLACK EXPERIENCE

Framing Identity: Representations of Empowerment and Resilience within the Black Experience is a curatorial project developed by Samantha Hill, 2019 – 2021 Joyce Bonk Fellow at the William L. Clements Library and graduate student at the University of Michigan School of Information. This exhibition takes a look at the representation of Black people in photographs throughout American history.

MUSEUMS AT NOON SERIES: OUR NATIONAL MARINE SANCTUARIES, PROTECTING AMERICA’S UNDERWATER TREASURES

Preserved by the cold freshwater on which they once served, more than 200 shipwrecks are believed to rest in Lake Huron’s Thunder Bay National Marine Sanctuary. Their excellent state of preservation and what they represent—a century and a half of maritime commerce and travel on the Great Lakes—that make them truly special. Stephanie Gandulla will take us on a freshwater journey to a time when schooner and steamer ruled the Great Lakes. 

When: Friday, Jan. 29, 12 p.m. EST

PENNY STAMPS SPEAKERS SERIES: HENRY LOUIS GATES, JR. AND ERIC FONER, IN CONVERSATION

Pausing for a moment of post inaugural reflection, following one of our nation’s most contentious presidential elections, this conversation brings together filmmaker, scholar, journalist and cultural critic, Henry Louis Gates, Jr. with prominent historian Eric Foner to contemplate how a divided nation comes together. The two will discuss Reconstruction, the all-too-brief period following the Civil War when the United States made its first effort to become an interracial democracy. The program will also preview Gates’ most recent project, The Black Church, which will premiere on PBS in February.

When: Friday, Jan. 29, 8p.m. EST

 

If you would like your event to be included in next week’s “Attend at Home” series, email arts-culture@umich.edu.