Due to the Coronavirus (COVID-19) museums and galleries are closed, and various events and exhibitions have either moved online or have been postponed. For U-M’s guide to living, learning and working together safely, please visit Campus Maize & Blueprint.

Attend at Home: Events + Exhibitions for the Week of January 18th

Attend at Home: Events + Exhibitions for the Week of January 18th

A new exhibition, "Story, Word, Sound, Sway," featuring Stamps School of Art & Design alumni, opens at Stamps Gallery on Monday, Jan. 18. Video still from Levester Williams, “Shift, Sift, Swoosh Bods,” 2018.

As we enter the winter 2021 semester, many of the museums, galleries, and performance venues at the University of Michigan will continue to be closed due to COVID-19 restrictions; however, there will still be plenty of online events, exhibitions, performances, and films that you can experience from home. This week, we are featuring a multitude of events planned in honor of Dr. Martin Luther King Jr.

U-M 2021 MARTIN LUTHER KING JR. SYMPOSIUM KEYNOTE SPEAKERS: DR. GLORIA HOUSE AND MALIK YAKINI

This year’s symposium features two speakers, Gloria House, poet, essayist, educator and human rights activist, and Malik Yakini, co-founder and Executive Director of the Detroit Black Community Food Security Network (DBCFSN). Read more about the keynote speakers and this year’s theme here. For a list of more MLK Day symposium events, visit the University Record’s compilation.

When: Monday, Jan. 18, 10–11:30 a.m. EST

PUBLIC MONUMENTS AND OUR HISTORIES: REFRAMING THE MEMORIES OF OUR NATION

Public monuments, public spaces, and museums shape the shared understanding of our nation’s history. In honor of the Rev. Dr. Martin Luther King Jr., join four experts on the power that monuments and public spaces assert in creating our nation’s stories: Mitch Landrieu, former Mayor of New Orleans; Earl Lewis, founding director of U-M’s Center for Social Solutions; and Kristin Hass, associate professor of American Culture, will discuss the crucial role practice and policy play today in shaping our nation’s legacies, in a conversation moderated by Christina Olsen, director of UMMA.

When: Monday, Jan. 18, 1–2:20 p.m. EST

MLK DAY AT THE U-M DETROIT CENTER: DIVINE IS THE SHEPHERD

In a world where uncertainty reigns, it can be a challenge to see a bright future for young people. Economic turmoil, climate change, civil unrest, and worldwide pandemics all combine to paint a scary future. These challenges are particularly acute in the City of Detroit. Join the U-M Detroit center as they meet with some leaders that have answered the call to discuss the challenges and triumphs of being a youth leader in Detroit.

When: Monday, Jan. 18, 1–2:30 p.m. EST

RACE, PROTEST, AND POLITICS: WHERE DO WE GO FROM HERE?

This lecture features Dr. Mary Frances Berry, who, for more than four decades, has been one of the most visible and respected activists in the cause of civil rights, gender equality and social justice. Serving as Chairperson of the U.S. Civil Rights Commission, she led the charge for equal rights and liberties for all Americans over the course of four Presidential administrations. Berry made history as one of the founders of the monumental Free South Africa Movement (FSAM).

When: Monday, Jan. 18, 2–3 p.m. EST

STAMPS EXHIBITION OPENING: STORY, WORD, SOUND, SWAY

Story, Word, Sound, Sway is an exhibition of work by eleven Stamps School of Art & Design alumni using performance, movement, text, sound, and design to interrogate systems of oppression and interrupt the status quo. It explores themes of alternative histories, archives, Black identity, collective memory, storytelling; meshing performance and performativity, and the interplay of the oral and aural in one’s experience of the world.

When: Monday, Jan. 18

ISR PRESENTS: COMMUNITY ENGAGED RESEARCH: REFLECTIONS ON MLK’S LEGACY

On Jan. 4, 2021, the Indiana Family and Social Services Administration welcomed Dr.Breanca Merritt as the agency’s first chief health equity and ADA officer. As the chief health equity and ADA officer, Dr. Merritt will provide leadership in the evaluation of policy decisions that affect race equity, build metrics for agency accountability, ensure agency adherence to the Americans with Disabilities Act, and work to build a culture of equity across the agency. In this discussion, Dr. Merritt will reflect on MLK’s Legacy and provide insight on community engaged research.

When: Wednesday, Jan. 20, 2–3 p.m. EST

TAUBMAN COLLEGE PRESENTS: BUILDING THE BELOVED COMMUNITY THROUGH TRAUMA-INFORMED DESIGN

According to Dr. King, “the Beloved Community is a global vision, in which all people can share in the wealth of the earth.” This symposium, led by Taubman College students, will explore community over chaos, the intersections of the twin pillars of economic and social justice, and the resources and education necessary to create the Beloved Community. The discussion will be moderated by Taubman College’s Harley Etienne, associate professor of Urban and Regional Planning, and will feature Craig Wilkins (U-M Taubman College), Lesley Lokko (Architect & Novelist), De Nichols (Civic Creatives / Harvard GSD), and Ujijji Davis (SmithGroup).

When: Thursday, Jan. 21, 6 p.m. EST

PENNY STAMPS SPEAKERS SERIES: AYANA EVANS, PERSONA AS SOCIAL JUSTICE

Ayana Evans is a NYC based performance artist who grew up on the south side of Chicago. The sensibilities of both locations heavily influence her work with the body, race relations, and gender bias. During the Fall 2020 semester, Evans created a new work of performance art for video as part of the Stamps School’s Witt Visiting Artist program. A video of the performance “You Better Be Good to Me,” will premiere as part of the program.

When: Friday, Jan. 22, 8p.m. EST

 

If you would like your event to be included in next week’s “Attend at Home” series, email arts-culture@umich.edu.