Due to the Coronavirus (COVID-19) museums and galleries are closed, and various events and exhibitions have either moved online or have been postponed. For information about U-M’s continued response to COVID-19, please visit the U-M Coronavirus website.

Law School Architectural Figures (Corbels)

Ann Arbor, MI

Ulysses Ricci and Angelo Zari
1923-1924; Limestone; Architectural Feature
Central Campus; Three passageways, north side of Law Quad (Lawyers’ Club) leading from South University into the Quad

The twelve corbels in the east passage represent the four seasons in harvests; the four seasons at U-M in sports; and four professions – engineer, architect, artist and jurist. The four corbels in the west passage represent military science, medical science, engineering/commerce, astronomy. The six large corbels in center passage represent the first six U-M presidents: Henry Tappan, Erastus Haven, Henry Frieze, Harry Hutchins, James Angell and Marion Burton. Ricci and Zari’s shop in New York City was famous for their “Boweryesque” corbels. Ricci was also the sculptor of the medallions on the facade of Hatcher Library, as well as the bas reliefs on the facade of Angell Hall and the bas reliefs on the CC Little Building.